Is Your Website “Dead on Arrival” or “Successful on Day One”


“Dead on arrival” – I can’t remember when I first heard that term. But I am sure I knew what it meant the moment I heard it. It was not hard to tell what “dead on arrival” meant. For certain, it doesn’t mean “successful on day one”.

Let me tell you a story.

John (this is not his real name) is a student in Nigeria. He is good at Java, and he writes simple programs for himself and friends. He imagined working for a top software company in the country or even abroad some day.

One day, he woke up with this brilliant idea of developing a JAMB Computer Base Test software. The application is for  students preparing for UTME conducted by JAMB. His idea got the approval of his peers and sponsor.

For some students in Nigeria, to get a sponsor for a project like this is not easy. But for John, he was lucky. He had a willing sponsor who invested time and money into the software project.

John was looking forward with excitement to the release of the application to the market.

He worked night and day; wrote a lot of codes. He coded and fine-tuned the design over and over to get the product. He looked at all that they had done through the months and saw that it was good!

Finally, John developed the CBT software. And, at the scheduled time released into the market. Yet it was “dead on arrival”. It never performed well in the market. They could not recover the money invested into the project.

Everything came to a stand still.

Only a few students even knew a software developed by John existed in the market.

John’s hosting company came after him for unpaid bills. His dedicated hosting platform and software licensing app needed renewals. He could not afford the bill. There was no money left to finance the project. All they were banking on was from the sells. And, as I earlier said, this project got the investment it needed, but it was a flop. The sever was shutdown, and the website closed.

What was wrong with John’s release?

  • Is he a good developer? Yes, he is.
  • Was it not what the students needed at that time? It was.
  • Was it a substandard software. No.
  • Did the software performed as advertised? Yes.
  • He didn’t have the right sponsor? Not quite.

John gave in his time and effort to bring out the best he could, so he deserved a fair share of the pie of success. Unfortunately, he never got one.

His project was “dead on arrival”. I believe you know what “dead on arrival” means by now.

When I met John, we worked together on the application for a couple of months and released it as JambMock. This time, he followed our methods. He has a story to tell.

Just like John, too many people spend hours or months to design that product, service, or podcast. They spend months building sites, arguing over web copy, only to launch to the sound of crickets.

Don’t be one of them.

This is how YOU can write your own story.

Sign up for my FREE Course. Learn “How to Launch a Website That is Successful on Day One!” I will walk you through the steps to launch that website, product or service of yours. It is 100% free and by email.

Please, help me share this message.

The following two tabs change content below.
Lead at Fruitfulujah Project. I consult, teach and help people build fruitful Internet projects. Every post I write, site I build, and podcast I make has 1# simple rule: "make it simple for everyday users". Also, a regular guest on Radio Benue FM95 ICT WORLD Show.

There are no comments

Say something!

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *